ALSIM Paint Shop

Overview

Retained Liquid and Bake Drip Simulation Using Geodesic Curves on Triangulations

Simulation tools are becoming more and more popular in the automotive industry because they can significantly reduce the costs required for the development of new models.  Currently, there are many computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools available on the market and they are becoming indispensable tools for R&D in many of the automotive applications.  However, there are also some applications which require highly skilled engineers to prepare the models.  Furthermore, some applications demand an impractical level of computation, despite using a cluster computer utilizing the conventional CFD tools, due to the nature of physics and complexity of a geometry such as the dip painting process.  Therefore, corrosion protection engineers are striving to find an alternative solution.  Another issue is that the main focus of those available CFD tools have problems occurring during the dip paint simulations.  Additionally, they omit problems occurring after the object dips out from the bath, such as retained water or bake drips. The presence of these phenomenon on the prototypes often requires change in the design which is expensive in the late stages of development.  In order to specifically solve those issues, a new tool, ALSIM, was developed using Reeb Graph theory and detection of geodesic curves on the mesh which enables simulation of the above-mentioned phenomena within in a few days, all on an affordable desktop PC.

Download the paper, which reveals the techniques enabling the above-described functionalities here.

Enhanced E-Coating – Thickness Plus Gas Bubbles, Drainage and Buoyancy Force

The development of entire car bodies benefits from simulations, especially if they are performed at an early stage of development because they lower the costs for required car body modifications. This paper focuses on a dip paint simulation and describes the simulation process as an e-coat (electric coating) thickness simulation which considers gas bubbles, drainage and buoyancy forces. This paper points out the advantages of this technology by explaining the theory behind this. A new hydrodynamic method is used which performs about 1000 times faster as standard computational fluid dynamics (CFD) solvers. In addition, this method allows executing the computation on standard desktop machines, i.e. no high-performance computer (HPC) is needed. In addition, we introduce a simple method to calculate the static buoyancy forces of arbitrary homogeneous objects and a simple model movement of an engine hood induced by buoyancy and drag forces.

 

Download the paper, which reveals the techniques enabling the above-described functionalities here.

Transient Dip Paint Simulation of Entire Car Bodies within One Day

The development of entire car bodies benefits from simulations, especially if they are performed at an early stage of development. Simulations lower the costs for required car body modifications. This paper focuses on dip painting simulation and describes the simulation process by detecting badly painted areas and liquid carryovers. A new hydrodynamic method has been benchmarked to CFD and real-life results. Results will be shown together with case examples. The solver is similar to, and as accurate as, standard CFD solvers; it is faster in its computation speed by a factor of at least 1000. The electrophoretic deposition (ELPO) of an entire car body can be simulated overnight with ALSIM. How is this possible?

 

Download the paper, which reveals the techniques enabling the above-described functionalities here.